Rainforest Rev: Microsoft’s Nadella and Steve Blank’s Playbook

The Rainforest RevolutionNews on growing ecosystems for innovation and entrepreneurship

 

How do you design ecosystems that empower innovators, entrepreneurs, and problem-solvers?

The Global Innovation Summit provides powerful insights, practical tools, a global community of fellow practitioners, and the chance to design real-time solutions to real-world challenges. It’s part of Global Innovation Week – more than 20 events and 1,000 participants from over 50 countries exploring innovation at one place! Register before November 30 and get 20% off!

SUMMIT: FEBRUARY 17-19  |  WEEK: FEBRUARY 15-21

 

THE BIG PICTURE


 

Thank You, Satya Nadella

Janet Crawford, Co-Creator of Rainforest Architects and T2 Venture Creation Advisor from Forbes
Reactions to the Microsoft CEO’s controversial statements on gender inequality should be informed by an awareness of the human brain’s unconscious wiring that guides our perceptions and behaviors. Read more here.

 

Born Global or Die Local – Building a Regional Startup Playbook

Steve Blank (blog)
Lessons learned from building Australia’s sports technology ecosystem show how the creation of a regional playbook for an area’s entrepreneurs can help them build scalable startups that thrive in the global marketplace. Read more here.

 

Leveraging Technological Change: The Role of Business Models and Ecosystems

International Journal of Technology Management
Technological change is much more transformative than mere product innovation — it enables the design of previously unseen business models and radical new strategies. Read more here.

 

How Procter & Gamble Uses External Ideas For Internal Innovation

MIT Sloan Management Review
Procter & Gamble is using outside intellectual property to spur its internal innovation through a version of open collaboration it calls “Connect + Develop.” Read more here.

 

Radical Innovation, Part II: Managing the Unmanageable

Knowledge@Wharton
This second installment in a series of interviews with Boston Consulting Group’s Kimberly A. Wagner looks at her latest work: “The Most Innovative Companies of 2014,” a peer study of executives that gives credit to companies with the most innovative cultures. See more here.

 

THE LATEST NEWS


 

Stockholm Is The ‘Most Prolific’ Billion-dollar Startup Hub Behind Silicon Valley

ZDNet
Stockholm has produced more billion-dollar enterprises than any other city in Europe, and Sweden’s capital may be second only to Silicon Valley as the world’s most successful hub for Internet startups. Read more here.

 

How Startups Are Tackling D.C.’s Poverty Problem

CNN Money
Community-based entrepreneurs are having an impact in the nation’s capital, which has the highest concentration of graduate degrees – and the highest poverty rates – of any city in America. Read more here.

 

Jakarta: Ripe For A Tech Start-up Take-off

Financial Times
The Indonesian capital has enormous potential as a startup hub, though few local start-ups have had the scale to warrant big funding from foreign venture capitalists. Read more here.

 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS


 

Demand Solutions 2014 — Venture Night

December 2, 2014  |  Washington, D.C.

Demand Solutions: Ideas for Improving Quality of Life is a one-day event sponsored by the Inter-American Development Bank and the Blum Centers at UC Berkeley and UCLA.  The event will close with an exciting Venture Night where some of the most innovative and disruptive startups established by young entrepreneurs from Latin America and the Caribbean will present their projects, chosen in a competition, which will be evaluated on Venture Night by a panel of expert judges.  Register here.


 

APPLY FOR THE INNOVATION ECOSYSTEM AWARDS 

We seek the world’s top companies and organizations that enable the super-linear growth of the ecosystems around them. They must catalyze the ideals of connectivity, openness, diversity, and trust that are essential to the innovation process. They must nurture the success of others.  Rather than a simple “Best Of” list, where one focuses solely on the entity itself, we are looking at what the entity does to catalyze more activity around itself.  We seek to reward those entities that create multiplier effects beyond themselves, that catalyze the growth of entire ecosystems.

Applications will be evaluated based on the following criteria:

  • Connections: does the company/organization connect people that are otherwise disconnected in meaningful, productive ways?
  • Platform: does the company/organization lower the cost of doing business across an entire system?
  • Culture: does the company/organization foster trust in the community, industry or society?
  • Motivations: does the company/organization demonstrate social responsibility or sustainable, systematic impact?
  • Team: how does the company/organization collaborate with employees, advisors, suppliers, distributors and other partners?

APPLY HERE


Rainforest Rev: The Most Entrepreneur-Friendly City In America?

The Rainforest Revolution
News on growing ecosystems for innovation and entrepreneurship

 

How do you create value in the new economy?

Join over 1,000 of your fellow “new economy builders” from more than 50 countries as we learn, love, and build together.  It all happens in Silicon Valley at the Global Innovation Summit – the centerpiece of Global Innovation WeekRegister before November 30 and get 20% off!

SUMMIT: FEBRUARY 17-19  |  WEEK: FEBRUARY 15-21

 

THE BIG PICTURE


 

Albuquerque’s Plan To Build The Most Entrepreneur-Friendly City In America 

Victor Hwang, CEO & Co-Founder of T2 Venture Creation, from Forbes
Albuquerque, New Mexico’s many assets can help the city achieve its ambitious goal with the help of people like Global Innovation Summit winner Elizabeth Kuuttila, who is helping to apply the science of innovation ecosystems to her work of cultivating a “Rainforest in the Desert.” Read more here.

 

Is Noise Good For Us?

Alistair Brett from the Rainforest Innovation Blog
T2 Venture Creation’s International Technology Commercialization Advisor Alistair Brett continues his analysis of the positive role “good noise” plays in the speed with which innovation moves through a network. Read more here.

 

The Blueprint of Multilevel Selection

Social Evolution Forum
David Sloan Wilson and Dag O. Hessen respond to comments on their essay that explores the potential role Norway could play as a “blueprint for the global village,” including the reactions of T2 Venture Creation CEO Victor Hwang. Read more here.

 

Four Ways Companies Can Encourage Innovation

Capital Ideas, University of Chicago Booth School
Data that emerged from a corporate database that tracked the progression of new ideas, and also tested whether incentives encouraged more and better ideas, has resulted in some simple steps organizations can take to promote creativity in the workplace. Read more here.

 

Radical Innovation, Part I: Unleashing Creativity

Knowledge@Wharton, Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania 
Boston Consulting Group’s Kimberly A. Wagner explains in this video how companies can bridge the gap between managers who want to foster creative ideas, and the people under them who have creative ideas but can’t get permission from the manager to put them into action. See more here.

 

THE LATEST NEWS


 

Let a Million Factories Rise

The Economist
The insular nation of Myanmar has launched the Thilawa Special Economic Zone (SEZ), which could help the country formerly known as Burma boost trade and investment with nearby giants China and India, as well as neighboring Thailand. Read more here.

 

Where Does the Creative Class Move?

CityLab
A recent study by a Census Bureau geographer traces the migration of the roughly 40 million American creative class workers between 1995 and 2011. Read more here.

 

Once, Cleveland Was America’s Startup Hub. Can History Repeat Itself?

Cleveland Plain Dealer
Historians are looking at Cleveland, Ohio’s early 20th century “age of invention” for ways to inspire a new generation of young innovators. Read more here.

 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS


 

Demand Solutions 2014 — Venture Night

December 2, 2014  |  Washington, D.C.
Demand Solutions: Ideas for Improving Quality of Life is a one-day event sponsored by the Inter-American Development Bank and the Blum Centers at UC Berkeley and UCLA.  The event will close with an exciting Venture Night where some of the most innovative and disruptive startups established by young entrepreneurs from Latin America and the Caribbean will present their projects, chosen in a competition, which will be evaluated on Venture Night by a panel of expert judges.  Register here.

 


 

APPLY FOR
THE INNOVATION ECOSYSTEM AWARDS 

We seek the world’s top companies and organizations that enable the super-linear growth of the ecosystems around them. They must catalyze the ideals of connectivity, openness, diversity, and trust that are essential to the innovation process. They must nurture the success of others.  Rather than a simple “Best Of” list, where one focuses solely on the entity itself, we are looking at what the entity does to catalyze more activity around itself.  We seek to reward those entities that create multiplier effects beyond themselves, that catalyze the growth of entire ecosystems.

Applications will be evaluated based on the following criteria:

  • Connections: does the company/organization connect people that are otherwise disconnected in meaningful, productive ways?
  • Platform: does the company/organization lower the cost of doing business across an entire system?
  • Culture: does the company/organization foster trust in the community, industry or society?
  • Motivations: does the company/organization demonstrate social responsibility or sustainable, systematic impact?
  • Team: how does the company/organization collaborate with employees, advisors, suppliers, distributors and other partners?

APPLY HERE


Albuquerque’s Plan To Build The Most Entrepreneur-Friendly City In America

Victor Hwang, CEO & Co-Founder of T2 Venture Creation, from Forbes

The city of Albuquerque, New Mexico has declared an ambitious goal. It wants to become the most entrepreneur-friendly city in the nation.

That’s a tall order. But more and more, it’s becoming an achievable target, because people are able to understand and apply the science of innovation ecosystems. That knowledge is helping Albuquerque get the right mix of social, business, government, and cultural factors to spark together.

Albuquerque—or ABQ, as the locals call it—has many of the basic assets in place. The city boasts a high-ranking, well-respected research university, two major research institutions, and a business-friendly local and state government. It is the cultural and entrepreneurial hub of the region.

These assets are crucial to Albuquerque’s success. But to foster entrepreneurial innovation at scale, you need more than mere assets. More importantly, you need the ecosystem. And for the ecosystem to happen, a city and its people needs to interact, mesh, and flow together. Dance in rhythm, if you will.

In a natural ecosystem, certain species have greater impact than others. While almost every species serves a purpose, certain species are “more equal than others” when affecting the vibrancy of the entire system. These critical species are called keystones. One example of a natural keystone species is the beaver, whose cutting down of old trees to build dams promotes the growth of new trees. Beaver dams—and the water that builds up behind them—also create breeding grounds for fish, salamanders, newts, and frogs. And the water behind beaver dams irrigates the surrounding area.

In human ecosystems, certain people or institutions can be keystones as well. They facilitate connections, command respect, and influence the push and pull of an ecosystem toward greater strength.

Elizabeth Kuuttila is one of the keystones of Albuquerque. She’s the CEO of the University of New Mexico’s STC.UNM (formerly known as Science and Technology Corporation), a non-profit company dedicated to cultivating a “Rainforest in the Desert” in Albuquerque.  Her team won an Innovation Ecosystem Award at my organization’s last Global Innovation Summit for their efforts.

Kuuttila noticed that Albuquerque had the right elements, but they weren’t necessarily interacting in the right ways. Much of the institutional infrastructure is certainly strong. ABQ thrives because “we can recruit entrepreneurs who want to live in Albuquerque because of the natural beauty, the sense of community, the weather. We’re very fortunate that we have this cadre of really talented entrepreneurial resources.”

But, she notes, the geographical makeup of the city itself is a hindrance. Albuquerque is a mid-sized city in terms of population (just under a million residents), but it is enormous in terms of land area. As a result, the 8-10 startup companies that STC.UNM spins off every year are, according to Kuuttila, “scattering throughout the city.” And Albuquerque’s two major federal research labs, Los Alamos and Sandia, have historically been unable to leverage their considerable intellectual resources into economic benefit for the region, operating quite separately from the city and its people.

The lack of an innovation district—a place where the city’s entrepreneurs, researchers, students, startups, investors and others can come together and interact—is an issue Kuuttila and STC.UNM recognized as a major barrier to a healthy ecosystem. As a result, they spearheaded an initiative called Innovate ABQ, in which a section of downtown Albuquerque will be built and geared toward “creating space where these collisions can occur.” In short, they seek to create a new keystone institution.

The initiative is getting across-the-board support. UNM president, Bob Frank, has expressed the need for Albuquerque to create “a critical, nurturing environment to generate opportunities.” And one of Albuquerque serial entrepreneurs, Stuart Rose, noted the need for an “ecosystem” where innovators can experiment, fail, and develop into something new, different, and better. He added that “in the rainforest, things die and decay, the DNA mixes and new life forms are created.”

The city government has committed $1 million to building the site, and the state of New Mexico is funneling funds from oil revenues into the project through its State Investment Council program.

Even architects and city planners are looking to buck traditional ways of thinking in favor of cultivating “collisions.” David Green of the urban design firm, Perkins & Will, wants the Innovate ABQ site to fulfill four main criteria: livability, walkability, accessibility, and sustainability.

However, leaders in Albuquerque realize that building a project is different from building an ecosystem. You have to pay attention to human scale in the design. Culture change happens from the bottom-up, not the top-down. Kuuttila says, “We can’t simply make some strategic investments. We have to resist the idea of central planning. What we have to do is coordinate with each other and continuously talk to each other about what we’re doing.”

In short, you don’t build a “Rainforest in the Desert” merely by planting trees. You do it by nurturing new weeds sprouting up.

Kuuttila finds great joy in being a keystone in Albuquerque. She remarks passionately, “I’ve always loved the idea of being a keystone. I really get a lot of satisfaction from helping people make connections that help them further their own business and technology interests.”

She adds, “To watch people making connections—sometimes it was a startup to a startup, sometimes it was an investor hearing a pitch, and sometimes it’s a student getting a job. I really like that.”

Victor W. Hwang is an entrepreneur, investor, and ecosystem builder in Silicon Valley at T2 Venture Creation. He is primary co-author of The Rainforest: The Secret to Building the Next Silicon Valley.


Is noise good for us?

“Every body has their taste in noises as well as other matters; and sounds are quite innoxious, or most distressing, by their sort rather than their quantity.”
Persuasion, Jane Austen, 1817.

Jane Austen was describing the feelings of one of her characters on entering the town of Bath “driving through the long course of streets …. amidst the dash of other carriages, the heavy rumble of carts and drays, the bawling of newsmen, muffin-men and milkmen, and the ceaseless clink of pattens* …. these were noises which belonged to the winter pleasures; her spirits rose under their influence.”

This month we pick up again the issues of network resiliency, perturbations, and noise, introduced in our September and October Blogs in this series. In September’s Blog investigations were cited indicating that the speed at which an innovation moves through a network increases when there are a “greater number of errors, experimentation, or unobserved payoff shocks in the system” (also called noise or variability).

How does a network see noise? As a series of perturbations changing the network’s state. Picture kicking a network and watching the resulting impact rippling through it.

Instinctively we think of noise as something to be eliminated but as you may have already realized this is not necessarily so. Some people find listening to music to be an aid to learning (we don’t have space here to get into why music, and not just the kind we hate, may be referred to as noise). As I write this blog I feel comforted by sounds of the city coming through my open window; I find it difficult to work and learn in a completely silent environment. Likewise, for an innovation ecosystem no noise means isolation from its external environment. A completely static, isolated, network will become dysfunctional. We can probably all cite examples.

For an innovation ecosystem, good noise keeps the system, and its people, alert by being connected to the larger environment and responsive to needed change. Not-so-good-noise is, for example, a perturbation which may disrupt a key link and cause a serious malfunction not by virtue of the magnitude of the perturbation but its type. Some apparently minor event could trigger a breakdown in trust between two critical organizations which in turn create a damaging disruption.

Another way of understanding the role of noise is that some form of energy is needed to prevent self-organizing complex innovation ecosystems, which as we know from past blogs in this series, are in non-equilibrium states, from dropping into the dysfunctional, static, equilibrium state mentioned earlier.   A non-equilibrium state is called a steady state system.steady state equilibrium 4

Before relating all this to innovation ecosystems it should be noted that a steady state system is not the same as a system in equilibrium. In A and B the level of water in the container is the same, However, in A the level is maintained in a steady state as water flows out is balanced by water coming in. In B the water is in equilibrium – nothing interesting is happening.

Complex adaptive systems have “basins of stability” – as introduced in our August Blog – which are steady state systems maintained by the feeding in of external energy. In non-equilibrium thermodynamics this heat energy goes under the quaint name of “housekeeping heat.” This housekeeping heat prevents the system from falling into a non-productive, static, equilibrium state. For corporations and innovation ecosystems this equilibrium would be a kind of self-satisfied stasis. However, if this maintaining heat vanishes the system may flip into another steady state which will require new maintaining/housekeeping energy. In the language of complex adaptive systems these steady states are known as “attractors.” The need for permanent noise to continuously restructure networks resembles housekeeping heat in steady-state thermodynamics.

Features of a steady state:

  • Conditions are stable within the system
  • Energy is continuously put into the system (housekeeping heat)
  • Over time, the system is maintained in a higher state of order than its surroundings

Features of an equilibrium:

  • Conditions are stable within the system
  • Net free energy either enters or escapes the system
  • Over time, any difference in entropy (state of disorder) between the system and the external environment tends to disappear

Thus, equilibrium is a special case of a steady state.

To sum up: noise can be a friend or an enemy to innovation ecosystems depending on whether it keeps the system alert or damages critical parts of the network. Jane Austin was right; it is the sort of noise that matters.

* A patten is the model of the required casting made in wood metal or plastics. it is used to produce the mould cavity in sand.

Next time: End of the year recap on what these blogs have told us about the practicalities of Rainforest Innovation Ecosystems.

All blogs in this series can be found at http://innovationrainforest.com/author/alistair2013/


Rainforest Rev: How Online Tools Can Help Identify Your Life Purpose

The Rainforest Revolution
News on growing ecosystems for innovation and entrepreneurship

 

How do we create startup communities in the new economy?  How do we accelerate entrepreneurship, technology, and impact at scale? The Global Innovation Summit is comingJoin us in Silicon Valley on Feb. 17-19, 2015. Register before October 31 and get 30% off!

 

THE BIG PICTURE


In Search Of The Life Purpose Algorithm

Henry Doss, Chief Strategy Officer of T2 Venture Creation, from Forbes
This second part of a conversation with the CEO of YouScience addresses the company’s method of using data to create online tools that can personalize the user’s search for a rewarding life purpose. Read more here.

 

Darwinian Model of Economics Flawed for Firms

The Sydney Morning Herald
The theory of evolution has been used to support conventional economic models that emphasize competition, but corporations today survive through their ability to promote internal cooperation. Read more here.

 

Using Open Innovation to Identify the Best Ideas

MIT Sloan Management Review
New research can help corporate managers who have grown fearful of open-sourced innovation methods after several companies were hurt by their botched attempts to crowdsource their innovation efforts. Read more here.

 

10 Calculated Risks That Lead To Startup Success

Forbes
Not all risks are created equal. The trick is to separate the smart risks from the bad risks. Read more here.

 

How to Build a Thriving Startup Ecosystem

Ympact (blog)
Working through the five levels of the “Startup Ecosystem’s Pyramid of Needs” can help develop the kind of culture that is the main ingredient in Silicon Valley’s “secret sauce.” Read more here.

 

THE LATEST NEWS


 

Why Entrepreneurs Find the Opportunity to Reinvent Detroit So Compelling

Entrepreneur
The Chinese symbol for crisis is comprised of two characters representing danger and opportunity. Nowhere is this idea more evident than in Detroit, where the city’s many problems have created a dangerous crisis that also presents a host of opportunities for entrepreneurs. Read more here.

 

Israel y América Latina. Ecosistemas Muy Diferentes, Aprendizajes Muy Importantes

Prodem (Spanish language)
There are elements of the startup ecosystem in Israel that Latin American countries would do well to adopt. Read more here.

 

Do the Most Hipster Thing Possible —- Move to Des Moines

National Journal
Iowa’s state capital has become a Silicon Prairie hot spot as millennials bring their startup culture to downtown Des Moines. Read more here.


Uber Will Lower GDP

Victor Hwang, CEO & Co-Founder of T2 Venture Creation, from Forbes

Here’s some news that might surprise you: Uber will lower America’s gross domestic product .  In fact, it has already started.  The more Uber grows, the worse our GDP will get.  And it’s not just Uber.  Many of its startup cousins—like Lyft, Airbnb, and others—are also guilty of shrinking our economic growth numbers.  The trend is about to become an epidemic.

How could that possibly be, you might ask?  How could new technology that gives us better, higher quality services diminish our economy?  Isn’t innovation supposed to make economies grow bigger and stronger?

This mystery is worth explaining, because the entire world’s GDP is about to start shrinking due to Uber and similar companies.  And it’s going to get significantly worse.  My prediction: within the next decade, this issue will become so problematic that presidents, prime ministers, and others will have no choice but to rethink the way they measure economic vitality.

So what is behind the “mystery of the shrinking GDP”?  Well, the problem is not with Uber, Lyft, or Airbnb.  The problem is not with America.  And the problem is not with GDP per se.  The culprit, in fact, is an invisible one.

Let me explain.  Uber is a high-profile example of the sharing economy, which revolves around the idea of people sharing underutilized resources.  In the case of Uber, it’s about spare passenger seats in cars.  Uber is a mobile app-based ride service, one that has upset many traditional taxi companies by stealing their customers.

The growing success of Uber means that people will get around more efficiently than before.  I’ve used Uber in several cities around the world already, and believe me, it is huge improvement over grabbing a random taxi and hoping for the best. Despite the political resistance that Uber and its cousins are facing in some markets today, they are going to win in the end.  Period.  They’re just vastly better user experiences.  Try them, if you haven’t yet.  You’ll see.

Despite that awesomeness, Uber will lower GDP, because GDP is about measuring production.  The more people use Uber, the less the economy will produce.  Why?  GDP is calculated by measuring (a) spending, (b) earnings, and/or (c) added value.  In the U.S., we calculate with spending.  Other countries use their own methods.  In theory at least, each of the measurements should work out the same.  One way or another, GDP measures things being produced, whether you look at it from the point of the view of the buyer, seller, or maker.

If someone takes an Uber ride instead of a regular cab, what happens?  The customer is spending less, a taxi driver somewhere is losing a customer, the Uber driver is making less than the taxi driver would have, and the customer gets where they want to go in a happier state.  Alternatively, traditional taxi companies may try to compete and start lowering their prices, as they appear to be doing.  Add it all up; you get a smaller number. GDP goes down.

How much will Uber lower America’s GDP?  I did some back-of-the-envelope calculations, based on numbers disclosed so far.  This year, it works out to about half a billion dollars, maybe more.  That’s not much in the big scheme of things.  Yet.  But it’s going to grow, especially as Uber or similar companiesexpand into corporate logistics and transportation.  That’s big money.  And new companies with other “sharing economy” models will launch, grow, and start to eat up our GDP too.

The problem is not that GDP is wrong.  It’s that GDP no longer measures much of the new value being created in our society.  We don’t have a measurement for the efficiency of the system itself.  Current tools, like GDP or inflation, measure what the system produces, not how the system functions.  The U.S. government recently tried to deal with this by adjusting the way it calculates GDP (by measuring R&D expenditures), but that is just trying to measure production of a different sort.

GDP is a useful indicator of economic health when companies are mostly focused on manufacturing things. However, we know today that an economy is not just indicated by the existence of things, like assets or wealth.  It’s also about how those things flow in the system.  And flow is driven by how interconnected people are, and how effectively the system enables connections to become valuable exchanges.  Trust among strangers, connections between diverse parties, mutual collaborations, shared visions, new teams being formed—these qualities drive flow, they lower systemic transaction costs.  That’s what we mean when we talk about ecosystems.

Uber might be helping us solve another puzzle.  It’s what economists call The Nordic Mystery.  For years,economists have struggled to explain the high quality of life in the Nordic countries, especially Denmark and Norway.  (Side note: I actually thought of this column while strolling in Stockholm.)  Despite their lower national GDPs, Nordic people retain high standards of living.  For example, Denmark’s GDP from 1991 to 2014 was only 0.37%.  Nordic countries may produce less, but they are more efficient at utilizing what they have. Nordic culture comes from large, close-knit tribes based on high levels of trust, which lowers the transaction costs for sharing resources.  Traditional Nordic culture might be called “Uber for everything.”

So what do we do about shrinking GDP?  For starters, we need to start seeing what is currently invisible.  We need a new measurement for the new economy.  Call it a Gross Ecosystem Index perhaps.  This would be a complement to GDP, not a replacement.  And it should be something that helps communities, cities, corporations, and countries get a practical grip on how to maximize their economic potential in the modern era.  By utilizing what they have, better.

Therefore, while Uber and its cousins will lower GDP in the years to come, that’s actually a positive thing.  They will help goods and services flow more efficiently, getting where they need to go at lower cost, with less production required.  Lower GDP shouldn’t worry us, as long as the loss is more than offset by more efficient utilization of what we already have.

And if the taxi drivers are friendlier, I’m all for it.

Victor W. Hwang is CEO of T2 Venture Creation, a Silicon Valley firm that builds startups and designs entrepreneurial ecosystems.  He is primary co-author of The Rainforest: The Secret to Building the Next Silicon Valley.


Rainforest Rev: How An Innocent Contract Can Stifle Entrepreneurship

The Rainforest Revolution
News on growing ecosystems for innovation and entrepreneurship

 

Join us in Silicon Valley on Feb. 17-19, 2015.
Ecosystems are being built everywhere — whether in companies, communities, cities, or countries.  Attend the Global Innovation Summit and and get insights and tools on making ecosystems thrive.  It’s the world’s biggest gathering of “ecosystem builders.”

 

THE BIG PICTURE


 

Death By NDA? How An Innocent Contract Can Stifle Entrepreneurship

Victor Hwang, CEO & Co-Founder of T2 Venture Creation, from Forbes
Interestingly, Silicon Valley’s startup community tends to sign fewer nondisclosure agreements than other places. Too many NDAs indicates a lack of trust in the ecosystem and can do more harm than good. Read more here.

 

Rainforests and Hand Grenades: Incubating Defense Innovation

Defense Entrepreneurs Forum
The Department of Defense’s new “Offset Strategy” for spending must be coupled with an approach that boosts “…rapid technology innovation at scale or what authors Victor Hwang and Greg Horowitt call ‘The Rainforest.’” Read more here.

 

How Being a Good Manager Can Make You a Bad Innovator

Forbes
Companies that want to create innovative products and services must adopt management principles that are frequently seen in start-ups – and that they don’t teach in business school. Read more here.

 

The Evolutionary and Biological Logic of Human Cooperation

Analyse & Kritik
This scholarly paper explains the evolutionary puzzle of human cooperation by maintaining that it isn’t new, it is maladaptive, and it has evolved by individual selection. Read more here.

 

To Get More Entrepreneurs, We Must Create Better Ecosystems

The Huffington Post
A 30-year trend of declining entrepreneurship in the U.S. has been blamed on the recent recession and government regulation, but the real culprit is our antiquated economic model. Read more here.

 

THE LATEST NEWS


 

Inclusive Innovation

Maria Douglass, a friend and collaborator of T2 Venture Creation (blog)
Efforts in India and Malaysia show how the ecosystem theory of innovation can be applied to developing regions. Read more here.

 

Trends IN Entrepreneurship: What is Happening in Indiana

VentureClub of Indiana 
T2 Venture Creation CEO and Co-Founder Victor Hwang’s Rainforest ideas set the tone for this report on the Hoosier State’s innovation economy, which draws from discussions with the players in its entrepreneurial ecosystem. Read more here.

 

Peruvian Scientists Disgruntled with ‘Brain Gain’ Scheme

SciDev.Net
Institutional deficiencies at home hinder scientists returning from an Inter-American Development Bank program that sends Peruvian researchers to partner with foreign universities. Read more here.


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